“The Angelique” built by Wilmington, NC home builder Mark Johnson Custom Homes was featured in the following article on Houzz.com!

Exterior Panel Shutters Cover All the Bases

If you’re looking to up the curb appeal of your home, consider dressing your windows with traditional exterior panel shutters. Originally designed hundreds of years ago as a functional window dressing for privacy and security, the paneled shutter still protects homes from weather, though in many cases these days the primary purpose may be for ornamentation.

Designed in all shapes, sizes and panel configurations, shutters can be mounted on operable shutter hinges or directly alongside the window. Choosing the design and color of panel shutters is much like choosing a door style. Select a panel layout and color that excite you, fit your home’s architecture and offer pizzazz and curb appeal.

Walnut-colored operable composite raised-panel shutters look beautiful with this home’s dark brown windows and washed and aged tumbled-brick exterior.

Click the link below to visit the Mark Johnson Custom Homes Houzz page!

MJCH Houzz Page

Wilmington, NC new home builder Mark Johnson Custom Homes has recently installed TRU-VUE FOLD doors in a home we are constructing in the Landfall community. This is a versatile folding door system with an inspired concept for bringing the outside in and extending the inside out, instantly creating an enjoyable space for living or entertaining.

The door set comprises three, four or five doors, which all simultaneously fold open together. Simply unlock the set, open the internal drop bolts and the entire unit glides open with a gentle push. Additionally, the door on the end hinges open and closed for easy access and everyday use.

To see the progress of the home we are constructing in the Landfall community, click the link below to view the Mark Johnson Custom Homes Flickr page.

MJCH Flickr Page

QuietFiber Soundproofing materialWilmington, NC new home builder Mark Johnson Custom Homes understands the importance of soundproofing certain areas of a home during construction. We would like to introduce  our readers to a product that has only been used in commercial building in the past, but is now being used in homes.

Engineered specifically for maximum noise absorbency and used extensively in the industrial and commercial field, QuietFiber is now being successfully introduced into non-industrial environments where reverberant sound and echo is a problem, including:

  • Restaurants, clubs, bars
  • Hotel lobbies, pool areas, dining areas
  • Single family homes, condos, apartments
  • Kennels, etc., veterinary offices, pet stores
  • Churches, hospitals, schools

Non-fiberglass QuietFiber is rated at the highest noise reduction level of “NRC 1.00″ (noise reduction coefficient, higher the number the better).

Areas of high noise levels including sound reverberation can be resolved easily and economically by introducing QuietFiber into as much of the area as possible.  The amount of noise reduction in highly reflective rooms will be directly relative to how much of the QuietFiber material can be installed into the room.  QuietFiber is available in 4 ft. x 6 ft. sheets x 2 in. thick. Ceiling tiles may also be replaced with QuietFiber.

Unlike other fibrous materials or fiberglass which does not have the high NRC ratings that QuietFiber has, QuietFiber is “hydrophobic,” meaning it will not absorb nor combine with water.  This is an obvious attribute should the material become wet, humid or need steam cleaning.  Marine noise reduction applications are endless.

Check out how QuietFiber has been used successfully to solve many types of noise problems.

Additional benefits:

  • Highest noise absorption rating of NRC 1.00 (exceeds fiberglass sound attenuation).
  • Black or white faced version can be used to replace ceiling ties to significantly reduce internal room noise and flanking from adjoining rooms.
  • Highest quality acoustical insulation in the building industry.
  • Hydrophobic, will not combine with water.
  • Will not support mold.
  • Easy installation.
  • Full outdoor weather and U.V. tolerant.
  • Easily used in conjunction with a high STC barrier material such as Acoustiblok.
  • Shows significant STC benefit when used  in wall or floor assemblies vs. fiberglass.
  • High temperature capable for high temperature sound abatement, i.e. generator enclosures.
  • Comprised of up to 90% recycled material.  100% recyclable.  Non-fiberglass.
  • QuietFiber® material is virtually fireproof.   Having a U.L. rating of “0 smoke” and “0 flame,” it more than meets any fire code (faced version has flame spread of 25). Both versions tested to ASTM E84.
  • **Entirely made in USA**

Article courtesy of: Acoustiblok.com

Wilmington custom home builder Mark Johnson Custom Homes is excited to announce that The Angelique was a Silver Award winner during this year’s Parade of Homes that took place April 28 – 29 & May 5 – 6. To view a video of the award winning home built in the Landfall community, simply click “The Angelique” below.

The Angelique

Sellers: Letting Go

October 27th, 2011

Wilmington home builder Mark Johnson Custom Homes would like to share with our readers an article courtesy of Realtytimes.com that was written to ease the minds of those contemplating the sale of their home in order to build a new one that is just right for them.

The decision to sell your home can come with a mixed bag of emotions. There is uncertainty and fear about how quickly your home will sell and for what dollar amount. There may be guilt about leaving behind family, friends, or neighbors. You may also feel anxiety about what is to come.

A less than stellar market has done little to ease these jitters. Many would-be sellers have even decided to forgo moves for fear that now isn’t the time to sell.

Many others who have made the leap are ruled by emotions of sadness or regret. How does one let go of a home where so many memories were made?

The answer is in the attitude. It’s not about letting go. It’s about moving forward.

In order to let go of the negative feelings you have about the selling process there are a few crucial steps to take.

First, be resolute about your decision. If we allow ourselves to go back and forth between “I should” and “I shouldn’t”, you’ll always have uncertainty. Decide once and for all what is best for your family. Many people make pro and con lists. Others simply go with what feels right.

Second, remember that memories aren’t housed in the walls of your home, they live inside your mind. Those last a lifetime! Plus, take lots of pictures and video to document what life was like in your old home.

Third, talk about your decision. Bottling or resisting emotions can simply make them more pronounced. If you feel anxiety, talk to your spouse, friends, and realtor about it. It helps having a sounding board for fears and questions. Bounce ideas off of them.

Next, be willing to compromise. Today’s sellers are finding tougher conditions. There are lots of homes on the market and that means more competition. Go into the selling process with the mindset that you may have to make certain concessions. Many sellers find they need to lower their price. They may need to pay the buyer’s closing costs. They may also need to move out sooner or later than they anticipated.

Finally, refocus your attention on the fact that you’re moving on to a new phase in life! Many of you will be experiencing moving-up to your dream home. No matter the reason you’re selling, get excited about the changes or opportunities in your life.

Article written by: Carla Hill, Realtytimes.com

2011 Cape Fear Heart Walk

October 13th, 2011

Wilmington, NC new home builder Mark Johnson Custom Homes is a team sponsor of the 2011 Cape Fear Heart Walk which will take place October 15th on the campus of UNCW. The event raises money for research and education efforts of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Our team hopes to see you there!

Cape Fear Heart Walk

Saturday, October 15, 2011 | Event Goal -$175,000

Campus of UNCW – Wilmington, NC | Registration at 9 am | Walk Begins at 10 am

Click Here to Make a Donation

Client Testimonial

October 6th, 2011

Wilmington home builder Mark Johnson Custom Homes prides ourselves in providing excellent service to our clients. We would like to share a testimonial from our most recent clients.

“Our experience with MJCH was first rate from start to finish. MJCH was hands-on with great attention to detail and costs from the initial planning stage through completion. They worked within our budget to provide us with everything we wanted in our new home and more. We experienced none of the horror stories you sometimes hear about constructing a home, and in fact, could not have asked for a better experience in constructing our new home. My wife and I have built three other new homes prior to working with MJCH, and I have personally been involved in construction and the legal representation of contractors since 1993. We absolutely would recommend MJCH, without hesitation. MJCH worked closely with us to develop the plans and a reasonable budget to construct our dream home, and then proceeded to construct the home on time and on budget. Having worked in construction for many years, I recognize that this is not always the case and is dependent on having a general contractor that’s primary focus is pleasing its clients. That’s the case with MJCH, and why they are a first rate builder that we highly recommend to anyone looking to build a home.”

Michael and Jeana Gandee

Hidden Battleship

January 12th, 2011

Wilmington, NC builder Mark Johnson Custom Homes encourages those in the Wilmington area to attend “Hidden Battleship” this weekend onboard the Battleship North Carolina. This is one of several events planned for the Battleship’s 50th Anniversary Celebration.

In 1960, the Navy announced its intentions to scrap the Battleship NORTH CAROLINA (BB55).  On this news, two Wilmingtonians, James S. Craig, Jr. and Hugh Morton developed a plan of action to save the ship.  With their valiant efforts along with thousands of citizens and countless school children in raising funds, the BB55 would be able to come to the state whose name she held.

 On October 2, 1961, the Battleship NORTH CAROLINA was moored in her present berth across from downtown Wilmington.  Later that month on October 12, she was open to the public for all to view. 

 Now, as we move into 2011, the Ship gets ready to celebrate her 50 years of being part of the wonderful legacy and state of North Carolina. Visit www.battleshipnc.com for a list of events taking place.

Hidden Battleship: Join us for a unique, behind-the-scenes tour of un-restored areas of the Battleship. The four-hour tour consists of small groups with guides. Guests explore the bow (officers’ country and boatswain locker), third deck (Radio II, brig, after gyro, storage rooms, ammunition handling, Engineer’s office, torpedo area), Engine room #1, the refrigerator compartments, and climb inside the fire control tower to the top of the ship. The Azalea Coast Radio Club will be in Radio II to explain their work on the ship’s radio transmitters.

$45/$35 for Friends of the Battleship. You must be 12 years or older to participate. Wear comfortable, warm clothing and sturdy, rubber-soled shoes; bring a camera, but no large backpacks. 8:30am-12:30pm & 1:30pm-5:30pm. Registration and payment required by Thursday, Janaury 13. For more information call 910-251-5797 ext 3006 or 3026.
Battleship North Carolina
#1 Battleship Rd
Wilmington, NC 28401

Architect Sarah Susanka on designing houses that feel spacious but don’t waste space.

Wilmington, NC home builder Mark Johnson Custom Homes would like to share with our readers a helpful article written by Evelyn Royer in ECOHOME Magazine that gives tips for “rightsizing” your home.

Dream homes designed by noted architect Sarah Susanka used to include grand foyers and formal dining rooms-spaces often vacant but for the dusting of the cleaning lady and the rush of air conditioning. But as the author of the Not So Big House book series, Susanka now advocates for “rightsizing” the American home.

“Oftentimes, when people hear the words ‘not so big,’ they assume I mean we should all be squeezed into little shoeboxes,” said Susanka during a webinar she recently conducted for the Journal of Light Construction, a sister publication of EcoHome. “Far from it.”

In her equation, homes built one-third smaller than the homeowner’s original design scheme routes square footage dollars into more purposeful space. For example, combining the dining room with the kitchen omits an entire room, while installing proper lighting can transform the space into an elegant dining area for entertaining.

Susanka shared several other simple tricks for building and remodeling a right-sized house:

Make it feel spacious. Walls make homes feel smaller but removing them is not the only answer for creating a spacious feel. To avoid a large, amorphous area, differentiate ceiling and floor levels, and add a column, a beam, or an arch.

Ceilings are like commas in a sentence, she said. “The commas break up the phrases into segments so you can understand the meaning; a lot of times architects will use ceiling height in the same way.”

A lower ceiling over a bed adds charm and character and a heightened one in the center of a living room makes the space feel larger. But don’t make it too high: “A 40-foot-high ceiling is wonderful for a state capital but it’s not exactly what you want in the evenings in which to watch television,” she notes.

Light it right. Adding a window at the end of a dark hallway or a lighted painting in a basement stairway transforms the experience for as little as it takes to install a recessed can.

Build to scale. A smaller room, designed to the scale of its occupants, is more comfortable and saves square footage, money, and wasted space.

Make it personal. Small touches such as beautiful tiles in a kitchen backsplash turn a generic space built for resale value into one that feels like home. And people stay in “homes” far longer than “houses,” the architect says. “If you don’t allow yourself to make your home personal, you’re actually going to want to move,” which isn’t as green of an option as staying put, says Susanka.

Remodel it small. Instead of adding a standard 20-foot-by-30-foot addition out back, “you may well be able to solve the problems of your existing house by staying within the footprint,” says Susanka. Look for places to redistribute space, remove a wall, or alter traffic flow.

If eliminating obstacles in the original design does not solve the problem, build a small bump-out to accommodate a necessary space, such as a shelf for shoes instead of entire mud room. And if there’s no way around it, build the smallest addition possible and make every square foot count.

Make it green. Green retrofits impact the environment more than most people assume, according to a study by the DOE’s Energy Information Administration. “A very little known fact is over 20 percent of all carbon emissions from all sources in this country come from existing housing stock,” Susanka quoted.

Evelyn Royer is assistant editor of Building Products magazine.

Article Courtesy of customhomeonline.com.


The Primrose at Landfall built in Wilmington, NC by custom home builder and remodeler Mark Johnson Custom Homes was recently recognized as one of the Most Innovative Small Residential projects in the country. The honor was presented as part of the ICF Builder Awards, an international competition designed to showcase the advantages of building with Insulated Concrete Forms, commonly called ICFs. ICFs are hollow foam blocks which are stacked and then filled with steel-reinforced concrete. The finished structure combines the strength of concrete with the insulating properties of foam, which stays in place to insulate and protect the walls. This construction method can reduce energy bills by up to 70 percent, block exterior noise, and is extremely disaster resistant. As an additional benefit, it is one of the most popular ways to “build green” costing between 5 to 10 percent more than regular frame construction.

The Primrose at Landfall was named First Runner-Up in the Small Residential division. The presentation, witnessed by hundreds of construction professionals associated with the industry, took place last month at the World of Concrete trade show in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The ICF Builder Awards are given annually to projects that demonstrate outstanding innovation, quality, and craftsmanship in ICF construction. “The variety and scale of projects being built with ICFs is truly astounding,” said Clark Ricks, editor of ICF Builder magazine and organizer of the competition. “It’s time these outstanding projects received industry-wide recognition, and we feel privileged to take a leading role in that.”

For more information about the ICF Builder Awards, go to www.icfmag.com.